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The Plantation, Norwich, Norfolk, England

The house on Earlham Road was remodeled into a small hotel for a number of years, but has been put back on the market as a potential one family home. There are fourteen bedrooms.

The house on Earlham Road was remodeled into a small hotel for a number of years, but has been put back on the market as a potential one family home. There are fourteen bedrooms. The gardens are now in the care of a historical society.

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The Plantation house seen from the garden.

The Plantation house seen from the garden.

 

George and Harriet Emma Prime Green after 1919

George and Harriet Emma Prime Green were resident at The Plantation from 1919, when he was elected mayor, until 1928.

The Plantation’s last private tenant was George Green, Gentleman’s Outfitter, who became Lord Mayor of Norwich in 1919.

George Green played a considerable part in public affairs – Alderman, member of Board of Guardians, Port Commissioner at Yarmouth, Magistrate, Chair of Sewerage committee. He merits a long entry already in ‘Citizens of No Mean City’ (1909)1Citizens Of No Mean City: Norwich – The East Anglian Capital. Notabilities of Bygone Days. Norwich Citizens of To-day. 1910. Jarrold & Sons ...continue

.During the 10 years that he lived at the Plantation, he loved to be photographed in the garden, with parties of visitors including his shop staff, groups of sea scouts and a convention of Baptist ministers.

George became Master of the Lodge at Cabbell’s Lodge on Rampant Horse Street in 1880. His son Frank and grandson Ivan also went on to be members.

George Green and Mayor setting out in the carriage of his office.

George Green and Mayor setting out in the carriage of his office.

This photograph shows him and Mrs Green setting out in the Mayoral carriage.

 

 

 

 

 

Homes included

  • 15 Rampant Horse Street (now Marks & Spencer),
  • Lyndhurst on Christchurch Road,
  • 3 Ipswich Road (somewhere near City College),
  • Eaton Grange and later the Plantation.

 

Neighboring property:

The cathedral of St John the Baptist

The cathedral of St John the Baptist (Roman Catholic) is an immediate neighbor of the Plantation garden. It was built between 1884 and 1910 on the site of the old city gaol. It was built for the 15th Duke of Norfolk and designed by G.G.Scott Jun. Henry Trevor must have been delighted when this prestigious building replaced the gaol, for he had a clear view of it from his garden. The nave was the first part of the building to be finished, in 1894, so this photograph must date after that.This view is of the East end, on the junction of Unthank Road and Earlham Road. The surrounding wall has yet to be built.

From The Plantation Garden website:   In 1856, a prosperous upholsterer and cabinet maker living in Norwich, took a long lease on an industrial site just outside the old City walls.  His name was Henry Trevor, and for the next forty years, he spent considerable sums of money and much effort transforming a chalk quarry into a magical garden.

In many ways, Henry Trevor’s garden was typical of Victorian taste and technology.  He built a fountain, terraces with balustrades, rock works, a Palm House, and a rustic bridge.

He planted elaborate carpet beds, woodlands and shrubberies.  He designed serpentine paths to conduct the visitor along circular routes, and he built and heated several greenhouses with boilers and hot water pipes.

Henry Trevor, however, was also a man of strong personal tastes. His “Gothic” fountain is unique, and he displayed great enterprise in using the fancy bricks from a local manufacturer to create medieval style walls, ruins and follies.  Within less than 3 acres, he established a gentleman’s residence and garden that reflected in miniature the grand country houses of the Victorian period.  Visitors were frequently welcomed in the garden by Henry Trevor, for he was always ready to allow his garden to be used for charitable causes.

The Plantation garden

The Plantation garden

The Plantation on Earlham Road

Notes   [ + ]

1. Citizens Of No Mean City: Norwich – The East Anglian Capital. Notabilities of Bygone Days. Norwich Citizens of To-day. 1910. Jarrold & Sons Publisher.