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New Netherlands (to 1664)

Before 1664

 

New Netherlands. Map by Nicolaes Visscher II (1649-1702)

New Netherlands. Map by Nicolaes Visscher II (1649-1702)

See also the excellent U.S. Timeline webpage: 1643 – The United Colonies of New England by Gerard Tondu.


The mid-seventeenth century was not only the period in which the Dutch colonized much of what is now New York State, it was also Holland’s Golden Age, when Rembrandt and Vermeer and dozens of other artists were busy documenting their world. Common people did not have their portraits painted, but they often showed up in art anyway.

The painting below was finished just a short time after Grietjen Westercamp was born in the New Netherlands colony.

British Seizure

Charles II

Charles II

When Charles II was restored to the English throne in 1660,  his brother James Duke of York and Albany became lord high admiral of the English Navy. It was on his initiative that New Amsterdam was seized from the Dutch in 1664. Charles granted territory between the Delaware and Connecticut rivers to James.

Charles II died in 1685 without an heir. He was succeeded by his brother James, who reigned in England and Ireland as James II, and in Scotland as James VII.

Colony Renamed

New Netherlands

New Netherlands

The former Dutch colony and its principal port, New Amsterdam, were named the Province and City of New York in James’s honor. Fort Orange, 150 miles north on the Hudson River, was renamed Albany after James’s Scottish title.

 

Dutch > English

Places Within (Dutch Names) Names under the British after 1664
Wiltwyck Kingston
Esopus Kingston
New Amsterdam New York City
Fort Orange Albany
Rensselaerswyck A patroonship now part of Albany
Beverwyck Community of fur traders north of Albany