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Moses Coolbaugh 1752 -1814 : I00550

databaseflagMoses Coolbaugh is a direct ancestor who fought in the Revolutionary War and who appears on the 1790 census, the first taken by the government of the new United States.

Durham Boat used during a recreation of Washington crossing the Delaware

Durham Boat used during a recreation of Washington crossing the Delaware. Source: Wikipedia

Moses was born in Monroe County in 1752 and in 1790 relocated from Northampton county to Wysox County, Pennsylvania with his family, by means of a Durham Boat.

The Durham boat “…was the sole means of moving commodities in both directions on the river between Philadelphia and points above tide. This boat was well known on the Delaware for more than a century.. even after the building of the canals, it was used on them as well as on the river to a considerable extent.”  Source

franklin houseHe at first occupied the Roswell Franklin house, opposite Towanda. The Franklin residence had been the scene of multiple attacks by the Iroquois allies of the British during the Revolutionary War.1Pearce, Stewart. 1860. The Annals of Luzerne County; a record of interesting events, traditions, and anecdotes. Philadelphia: Lippincott. Other ancestors were involved in this same series of battles, including what is referred to as the Wyoming Valley massacre on July 3, 1778 when the British, led by John Butler with about 700 Indian allies, killed nearly 300 Wyoming Valley settlers.

Moses Coolbaugh was one of the most prominent men of his time in Upper Luzerne County, which then included Bradford (now in Bradford County). In 1793  Governor Mifflin appointed him a justice of the peace for Tioga Township. In 1806  he was elected to the Lower House of the State Legislature, serving a term of one year. He was later  a magistrate, and had positions of some responsibility in his church.   Source: Towanda Daily Review, July 9, 1903 “History of Wysox: Pioneer Families.”

The following excerpt from a history of Bradford County provides more perspective on the Indian aggression toward the settlers.

When [Coolbaugh] came the low land below his house was covered with willows, in which were several Indian huts of some of the Delaware tribe, probably; they used to make willow baskets. He bought of Asahel Roberts, who had preceded him and made the original location. Roberts cultivated a part of the flats, which had been cleared by the Indians. 2Heverly, Clement. 1913/1915. Pioneer and Patriot Families of Bradford County, Pennsylvania, 1770-1800: Including History (1615-1800), Marriages ...continue

Real estate and property laws were very complicated both before and after the revolution. Before the revolution

In order to regulate the settling of their lands and to retrieve payment from squatters who settled before 1754, the Penns further updated the application system, which consisted of a series of documents including application, warrant, survey, and patent. These records documented the name of the person applying for the land, the number of acres desired, county and townships in which the land was located, and an actual drawing of the boundary lines. The Penns also appointed four proprietary agents to administer the application process. These agents were secretary of the Land Office, surveyor general, deputy surveyor, and receiver general, listed in the order that their services were utilized in the land surveying process.  Source

Notes   [ + ]

1. Pearce, Stewart. 1860. The Annals of Luzerne County; a record of interesting events, traditions, and anecdotes. Philadelphia: Lippincott
2. Heverly, Clement. 1913/1915. Pioneer and Patriot Families of Bradford County, Pennsylvania, 1770-1800: Including History (1615-1800), Marriages (1776-1850), Soldiers of the Revolution, Ministers, Justices, Original Officers and All Matters Relating to Early Times. Available online at Joyce Tice’s Tri-County Genealogy Website here.

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